Use of Epidemic Intelligence from Open Sources for global event-based surveillance of infectious diseases for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games

Authors

  • Manami Yanagawa World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines
  • John Carlo Lorenzo World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines
  • Munehisa Fukusumi Center for Field Epidemic Intelligence, Research and Professional Development, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Tomoe Shimada Center for Field Epidemic Intelligence, Research and Professional Development, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Ayu Kasamatsu Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Masayuki Ota Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Manami Nakashita Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Miho Kobayashi Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Takuya Yamagishi Center for Field Epidemic Intelligence, Research and Professional Development, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Anita Samuel Center for Field Epidemic Intelligence, Research and Professional Development, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Tomohiko Ukai Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Katsuki Kurosawa Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Miho Urakawa Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Kensuke Takahashi Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Keiko Tsukada Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Akane Futami Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Hideya Inoue Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Shun Omori Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Hiroko Komiya Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Takahisa Shimada Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Sakiko Tabata Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Yuichiro Yahata Center for Field Epidemic Intelligence, Research and Professional Development, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Hajime Kamiya Center for Field Epidemic Intelligence, Research and Professional Development, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Tomimasa Sunagawa Center for Field Epidemic Intelligence, Research and Professional Development, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Tomoya Saito Center for Emergency Preparedness and Response, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan
  • Viema Biaukula World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines
  • Tatiana Metcalf World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1517-6725
  • Dina Saulo World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines
  • Tamano Matsui World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines
  • Babatunde Olowokure World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5365/wpsar.2022.13.3.959

Keywords:

mass gatherings, public health surveillance, infectious diseases, Tokyo

Abstract

The establishment of enhanced surveillance systems for mass gatherings to detect infectious diseases that may be imported during an event is recommended. The World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific contributed to enhanced event-based surveillance for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games (the Games) by using Epidemic Intelligence from Open Sources (EIOS) to detect potential imported diseases and report them to the National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID), Japan. Daily screening of media articles on global infectious diseases was conducted using EIOS, which were systematically assessed to determine the likelihood of disease importation, spread and significant impact to Japan during the Games. Over 81 days of surveillance, 103 830 articles were screened by EIOS, of which 5441 (5.2%) met the selection criteria for initial assessment, with 587 (0.6%) assessed as signals and reported to NIID. None of the signals were considered to pose a significant risk to the Games based on three risk assessment criteria. While EIOS successfully captured media articles on infectious diseases with a likelihood of importation to and spread in Japan, a significant manual effort was required to assess the articles for duplicates and against the risk assessment criteria. Continued improvement of artificial intelligence is recommended to reduce this effort.

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Published

15-09-2022

How to Cite

Yanagawa, M., Lorenzo, J. C., Fukusumi, M., Shimada, T., Kasamatsu, A., Ota, M., Nakashita, M., Kobayashi, M., Yamagishi, T., Samuel, A., Ukai, T., Kurosawa, K., Urakawa, M., Takahashi, K., Tsukada, K., Futami, A., Inoue, H., Omori, S., Komiya, H., Shimada, T., Tabata, S., Yahata, Y., Kamiya, H., Sunagawa, T., Saito, T., Biaukula, V., Metcalf, T., Saulo, D., Matsui, T., & Olowokure, B. (2022). Use of Epidemic Intelligence from Open Sources for global event-based surveillance of infectious diseases for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Western Pacific Surveillance and Response, 13(3), 7. https://doi.org/10.5365/wpsar.2022.13.3.959

Issue

Section

Surveillance System Implementation / Evaluation