Fireworks-related injury surveillance in the Philippines: trends in 2010–2014

Authors

  • John Bobbie Roca Field Epidemiology Training Program, Epidemiology Bureau, Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines; Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines
  • Vikki Carr de los Reyes Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines
  • Sheryl Racelis Field Epidemiology Training Program, Epidemiology Bureau, Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines; Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines
  • Imelda Deveraturda Field Epidemiology Training Program, Epidemiology Bureau, Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines; Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines
  • Ma Nemia Sucaldito Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines
  • Enrique Tayag Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines
  • Michael O'Reilly Emerging Disease Surveillance and Response Unit, Division of Health Security and Emergencies, World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5365/wpsar.2015.6.1.014

Abstract

Analysis of the annual fireworks-related injury surveillance data collected by the Philippines Department of Health (DOH) in 2010–2014 was conducted to describe the profile of such injuries in the Philippines.

Surveillance data were collected from DOH’s Online National Electronic Injury Surveillance System and analysed. A case was defined as any person who had sustained injury from fireworks in any form within the 16-day surveillance period (21 December to 5 January) and had presented to any of the 50 sentinel hospitals.

Of the 4649 cases, there were 4706 fireworks-related injuries involving 5076 anatomic sites in 2010–2014. A significant decrease of cases in 2014 was observed when compared with the previous study years (P = 0.02). The number of cases peaked at public holidays. Males (80%) were more commonly injured, and children aged 5 to 14 years were primarily affected (47%). Ignition of illegal fireworks accounted for half (50%) of the injuries; most injuries (68%) occurred in street settings. The majority of injuries (57%) were sustained by fireworks igniters. The most common anatomic injury sites were hands (44%), legs (21%) and eyes (14%). Illegal fireworks were related to 100% (4/4) of the deaths and 49% (105/214) of the cases who needed amputations.

Fireworks-related injuries declined significantly in 2014. Public awareness campaigns may have contributed to reducing the injury occurrences. As illegal fireworks accounted for all deaths and more than half of the amputations, law enforcement should be directed towards preventing importing, distributing and using illegal fireworks.

Author Biography

John Bobbie Roca, Field Epidemiology Training Program, Epidemiology Bureau, Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines; Department of Health, Sta Cruz, Manila, Philippines

Fellow - Field Epidemiology Training Program

Epidemiology Bureau

Department of Health

Manila, Philippines

Published

11-11-2015

How to Cite

Roca, J. B., de los Reyes, V. C., Racelis, S., Deveraturda, I., Sucaldito, M. N., Tayag, E., & O’Reilly, M. (2015). Fireworks-related injury surveillance in the Philippines: trends in 2010–2014. Western Pacific Surveillance and Response, 6(4). https://doi.org/10.5365/wpsar.2015.6.1.014

Issue

Section

Surveillance Report