Implementation and use of a national electronic dashboard to guide COVID-19 clinical management in Fiji

Authors

  • Karen Hammad World Health Organization Division of Pacific Technical Support, Suva, Fiji; Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia; College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8909-3191
  • Sean Casey World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines; School of Population Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2934-3643
  • Rigamoto Taito Lautoka Hospital, Lautoka, Fiji; Ministry of Health and Medical Services, Suva, Fiji https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4332-0499
  • Sara W Demas World Health Organization Division of Pacific Technical Support, Suva, Fiji
  • Mohita Joshi Office of the Pacific Islands, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, Suva, Fiji
  • Rashmi Rita United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, Office of the Pacific Islands, Suva, Fiji
  • Anaseini Maisema Ministry of Health and Medical Services, Suva, Fiji

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5365/wpsar.2023.14.5.967

Keywords:

clinical decision-making, case management, COVID-19, patient isolation, health resources, data management

Abstract

Problem: From April to September 2021, Fiji experienced a second wave of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) precipitated by the Delta variant of concern, prompting a need to strengthen existing data management of positive COVID-19 cases.

Context: With COVID-19 cases peaking at 1405 a day and many hospital admissions, the need to develop a better way to visualize data became clear.

Action: The Fiji Ministry of Health and Medical Services, the World Health Organization and the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs collaborated to develop an online clinical dashboard to support better visualization of case management data.

Outcome: The dashboard was used across Fiji at national, divisional and local levels for COVID-19 management. At the national level, it provided real-time reports describing the surge pattern, severity and management of COVID-19 cases across the country during daily incident management team meetings. At the divisional level, it gave the divisional directors access to timely information about hospital and community isolation of cases. At the hospital level, the dashboard allowed managers to monitor trends in isolated cases and use of oxygen resources.

Discussion: The dashboard replaced previous paper-based reporting of statistics with delivery of trends and real-time data. The team that developed the tool were situated in different locations and did not meet physically, demonstrating the ease of implementing this online tool in a resource-constrained setting. The dashboard is easy to use and could be used in other Pacific island countries and areas.

Author Biographies

Karen Hammad, World Health Organization Division of Pacific Technical Support, Suva, Fiji; Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia; College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

Karen is passionate about preparing individuals, healthcare workers and health care organisations for disasters and other high visibility events. Karen has completed a PhD and also has expertise in assessing hospital readiness and preparing hospitals for disaster; developing and delivering disaster education and training programs in disaster response, emergency nursing and hospital emergency codes; undertaking and disseminating research and public speaking. Karen has held positions in the university sector, as a hospital coordinator and as a health care consultant for international organisations and private business. Karen graduated as a Registered Nurse in 1996 and has continued to work in a clinical capacity since this time in public and private emergency departments in South Australia. Karen is goal oriented with a strong work ethic, she is a people person and has led groups and teams of people from various backgrounds with successful outcomes.

Sean Casey, World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines; School of Population Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

With more than 15 years of experience in health emergencies, international humanitarian response, development, and human rights programming spanning over 40 countries on four continents, Sean Casey has led large-scale, complex humanitarian action in some of the most significant crises of the past decade, including the West Africa Ebola outbreak, the Nepal earthquake, Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, conflicts in Mali and South Sudan, and the Haiti earthquake and cholera outbreak, among many others. Casey has extensive experience working with a wide range of humanitarian and development donors, governments, NGOs, UN agencies, and with communities affected by outbreaks, conflicts and natural disasters. He has a unique and dynamic ability to communicate and advocate with high-level stakeholders, with a wide range of partners, with global audiences, and with affected communities. He has made frequent appearances in the international press, including the New York Times, Washington Post, BBC, CNN, and Al Jazeera. In 2015, AidEx named Casey ‘Humanitarian of the Year.’

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Published

22-02-2023

How to Cite

1.
Hammad K, Casey S, Taito R, Demas SW, Joshi M, Rita R, Maisema A. Implementation and use of a national electronic dashboard to guide COVID-19 clinical management in Fiji. Western Pac Surveill Response J [Internet]. 2023 Feb. 22 [cited 2024 Apr. 20];14(5):7. Available from: https://ojs.wpro.who.int/ojs/index.php/wpsar/article/view/967

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